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binäre optionen welt Hello, hello! today I am back with a chatty post about my experience balancing part-time study and full- time work. After I graduated from my Geography degree in 2012, I have spent the last few years working in Marketing and decided in 2015 to go back and study for a Chartered Institute of Marketing Certificate in Professional Marketing. This was normally a year long course but in the end it took me two years  (more about that later) however I completed it and now I have the certificate which I am very proud of.

The first module, I remember sitting down and actually feeling very nervous about studying because I hadn’t studied for a while and I really understood why mature students get so nervous! I soon got into the swing of things however. One thing you learn early on is that you need to keep on top of things and that the homework you cannot really miss, as if you do you are missing out on the extra learning which is only going to bite you in the bum later on. I had an exam for the first module so the pressure was off in terms of coursework. I was very lucky that I was allowed two days off per module for paid study leave at my work. Three weeks before I also dedicated one day of my weekend for exam prep.

The coursework modules were so much harder. The CIM is different to normal uni in that your lecturer can only look at your work once and not really give you much feedback. This is quite difficult with the CIM because at times I found the questions quite vague (my biggest bugbear of the entire course!) and half the time was spent deciphering these stupid questions but once you got you get your head around them it is ok. You have to start the coursework quite early because if you don’t you will easily fall behind. My lecturer was quite helpful in the fact that he had set out a timetable as a indicator of when different parts of the coursework should be completed, so I just followed that.

The final course work was Digital Marketing and that module practically broke me. It consists of six tasks. One of which is a podcast, Powerpoint, two blogs a briefing paper and a report. This module was so hard, in terms of sheer workload. I took about four days off and was working almost every Sunday from the start of the module to make sure I kept ahead. Again this module had a timetable to keep by, I did feel that we spent too long on the podcast (I think it took us three weeks) and not enough time on the other tasks.

My experience balancing both is that it certainly is doable especially if you don’t have any caring commitments (I don’t know how parents do it!). You just have to stay on top and try and dedicate a day to getting all the revision and course work done. I would also try and see if you can use a project for work as also part of your coursework as you are then killing two birds with one stone. Certainly booking annual leave helped as it allowed me to have a weekend and helped me not to burn out. If you do feel burned out or you end up with extra commitments – don’t be afraid to take some time out. I decided to take a year out between my second and final module and I am so glad I did. Yes it was annoying that I had to wait a whole year but the module felt so much more manageable and I could fully focus on it. I couldn’t believe the difference in my attitude from 2016 to 2017.

When things get tough try to remember why you decided to take the qualification in the first place for me it was to give me a better chance for the future and also for me to take the experience back into my current workplace and implement – which I already have.

Studying Geography at University
Me in my graduation gown 🙂
(Image Source: Authors Own)
Studying Geography at University
Throwing our mortar boards in the air!
(Image Source: Authors Own)

Today seems rather fitting for this post as it has been three whole years since I have graduated from university. In England, it usually takes three years to complete a bachelor’s, therefore it has been a whole degree cycle since I have finished. I studied a BA (Hons) in Geography and got a 2:1 and a certificate for best final year performance and although I work in Marketing now (yes completely different career path) I did enjoy my course and took some skills that have helped me. If you are interested in studying Geography at university or just want to read about my experience then read on.

Why Did I Study Geography?
Geography was by far my favourite subject in school. I got an A at GCSE and B at A-level. I had an interest in the world for a very long time exacerbated by the fact that I had only been abroad a couple of times when I was young. I wanted to see more of it! I decided to study at Staffordshire University for a number of reasons including all field trips were free ( which is a massive plus as you will see later), the area to live in was cheap (as it is based in Stoke-on-Trent), the lecturers seemed really friendly and because I had studied Geography for so long, I felt comfortable in continuing the subject rather than starting a subject I had never studied before.

What Was The Course Like?
In the first year, the lecturers focus on building your skills so everyone is up to the same level.  This included creating maps on Adobe Illustrator, a field trip to Cannock Chase where we had to take lots of soil samples! An overnight field trip to the Peak District where we had to look at the pro’s and con’s of placing a fictional reservoir at a place called Edale and a module in human Geography which focused on the slave trade. I wasn’t keen on first year as it felt that there wasn’t enough human geography. This was intentionally done so people could swap to physical Geography they could, but frustrating for those who knew early on what they wanted to specialise in.

The second and third years were more focused, I remember a module called Cities where we explored how they were functioned and built. A module where we looked at financial districts around the world and how they worked. There was a module called Investigating Geography where we honed our research methods and built a research project. I took a module called Geographical Information Systems (GIS) which is an absolute must if you want to go down a Geography/ environmental type of career, as it combines mapping with data. I mapped land uses in Stoke- On-Trent as one of my assignments. The annual field trip was to Bangor in Wales where we looked at sand dune formation and how and why seaside towns are formed as they are and what impact has this formation has on tourism.

In my final year, I studied this topic called Refugees and Immigrants. It was by far one of my favourite modules. It looked at world migration movements and why people migrate, the implications and there was an in-depth view into the terminology used in migration.

In addition, I undertook two research projects- my dissertation which was exploring Staffordshire University students’ attitudes towards the environment and researching if the Times of India reported on certain environmental issues more than others. The second research project of which I had to be interviewed by my lecturers as it was a research project where you worked alongside your lecturer. I was quite pleased to get this as I was up against people I knew and I am very competitive. Finally there was a field trip to Barcelonia!

What Were My Lectures Like?
The lectures were a mix. So modules such as Cities were very much taking notes and reading in your own time afterwards with essays and an exam. The field work was very hands on. Lots of data recording and taking photos and bagging up soil samples. There was a lot of group work and presentations, presentations I think are really important as I have done far more presenting at work than writing essays.

I remember my course being very organised. You knew the dates for everything in advance and you knew what was expected of you. If you were not sure about something, the lecturer’s door was pretty much always open. That is particularly important as I have heard some proper horror stories of lecturers not turning up, personal tutors not being helpful or in some cases the course not existing when people arrived to study.

What Would You Have Done Differently?
Looking back I would have definitely got myself a placement in the holidays (although I did work full time as a cleaner, so I wasn’t sitting around and doing nothing) and worked part-time during term time. In my current role where I occasionally read application forms, a placement really makes you stand out, as it has shown you can apply what you have learnt in lectures. As much as I enjoyed being on a sports team I feel that at university, it shouldn’t be treated like an extension to school and that having a job where you are dealing with customers shows interviewers that you can work in a variety of difficult situations. It is a lot harder to show this being part of a sports team.

I should have done more research into what occupations you can go into after Geography and what people did with their degree. Afterwards when I was researching I found there were very few geographical and environmental roles around in the area where I lived. When you find yourself looking at graduate schemes a lot of companies won’t accept applications from those with Geography degrees as they prefer someone with English or Business Studies or Marketing. So keep that in mind.

What Were Your Opinions Of Your Course?
Overall I thought the course was good and the lecturers were always really supportive. I did enjoy the content and the field trip in Barcelona was really fun. I do think (and although I am speaking from experience of my course, it could apply to others) that there were missed opportunities where my course could have gone from good to amazing.

In my first year, I remember in groups we had to produce a poster advertising this new fictional reservoir in Edale. Rather than just creating a poster we could have done a whole marketing campaign on it. We could have had lessons from the business department on marketing. Since I am in marketing now it would have given more of those ‘transferable’ skills that these employers crave rather than just a poster done on Publisher.

I didn’t appreciate it then, but I am so glad the field trips were free. I have spoken to people who studied at other universities and they would have to save up £800 to go on this compulsory trip. With rent and living expenses, it is a lot of money on top to think about. I appreciate Barcelonia is not that far away compared to some far flung places other universities go on (one of my friends went to Africa for his final year trip) however I would rather go to somewhere in Europe and not pay rather than go further afield.

What Did I Do With My Course?
Soon after I graduated I managed to get an internship at the SU for a year. After that I moved into marketing where I am currently at now.

Why Should You Study Geography?
If you want a career in the environment or have an interest in the world around you Geography is a good subject to study. If you are very data driven GIS is good route to go down. Geography is a good subject to build quite a few skills such as writing, data collecting even design. However these days I recommend you have at least a basic idea in what you want to do with the degree and work your way to meeting this target.

So there we have it. Three years of my degree condensed into one post. I hope you can see a glimpse into why I studied Geography and what I thought of the course.

Welcome to my second part of ‘What I Wish I did At University’ if you have recently joined and haven’t read the first part then you can do so here.
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forex valuta avgift Be Proactive 

To an extent I am good at motivating myself to get things done. However this point has been added because the number of students that moan that there courses do not include a placement but then

do not arrange work experience themselves is staggering. By planning your own placement in the university holidays (and face it students, you do get a lot of time off!) will show employers that you have a genuine interest in your chosen career path, initiative (or common sense depending which way you look at it), and motivation find your own placement.
valutahandel dollar Learn how to use software packages effectively
As dorky as it sounds it was only until after university and in my first full time role that I realised I just had no sodding idea how to use Excel and Outlook properly. Excel is such a powerful tool and the stuff I know now would have been really useful in my degree. If I had listened more to my Photoshop classes I would have been a lot better at Photoshop then I am now.
http://poloclubmiddennederland.nl/index.php?Itemid=12 Attend lectures outside your subject area.
A little known fact is you can attend lectures in other subject areas as long as they are not oversubscribed. A little knowledge about business and marketing from lectures would have been really handy and shows employers that you are not just one dimensional but proactive in furthering your skills set. follow site Creating contacts
It took until my first proper job to really understand what it meant by building a list of contacts. At Uni I didn’t build any contacts at all. Now working in marketing means I have contacts with print suppliers and design agencies, as well as a couple of handy work mates when I need advice. I also use Linked In to build a set of professional contacts. Linked In is a great tool to get yourself out there. A couple of people I know have had job offers through Linked In.

enter Don’t be too over reliant on Extra Curricular Activities
Here I am not saying don’t participate in extra curricular activities but doing them alone will not get you your dream job. Being Captain of a uni sports team for example is great as it shows team work and communication skills (and probably the ability to drink copious amounts of pints) but its not going to score you many points with employers. I think this is because by now employers expect you to be or have had some real work experience and not just sticking within your comfort zone. I used to play in a university sport team, be a course rep and take part in environmental audits for the university Green Impact scheme. Which although I enjoyed it is totally different from being employed in a work environment.

Par quelles lois sont régies les http://dijitalkss.com/tag/kamu/feed/ piattaforma trading binario bonus en Suisse ? Quel régulateur prend en charge ce produit ? Quel taux d'imposition ? Réponses ici. Keep yourself as free as possible
When I was younger (and more naive) I would go into shop jobs and have a couple of weekends where I wouldn’t be able to work when I could have really cancelled my plans. Looking back what is the point of employers employing someone who isn’t free straight away. I know a lot of students have genuine responsibilities which is absolutely fine. Sometimes I feel that people are too restrictive when they are choosing their first jobs. Some people very much want a 9.00- 5.00 Monday to Friday job when they have no other responsibilities or going for roles which are way over qualified experience wise for. I think if you being too restrictive and picky it will only damage your prospects and potentially you will be looking for a job a lot longer.

 

Image of a Lacrosse team on a Sports tour

 

As many students are starting or making there way back to university it has got me thinking about my time at university and how I didn’t really make the most of it. I left university two years ago graduating with a 2:1 BA Hons Geography degree.

I have been lucky and had a job I really enjoy since graduating but I know for a lot of recent graduates this has not been the case and it has been a hard time facing unemployment. When you drill down to the reason why jobs are so hard to come by for graduates, it is usually the lack of relevant experience. University isn’t a three year piss up anymore, with employers looking for more than just shop experience for you to stand out about the increasing volumes of applicants. This has made it tougher than ever to land a meaningful role. This post goes through some of the decisions I have made and what I would tell my 18 year old self now.

click Choose a Course with a Placement Year
My course did not include a placement year. Looking back this does put you at a disadvantage for a variety of reasons. A placement year is a great opportunity to try a career path or to explore a new one. A previous friend of mine found that the career path she originally wanted to follow (journalism) was not the right path for her after going on placement at a local radio station.
Placements lead you to making connections which will help you in the future and could even lead you to a job. My fiance got a job after a week’s work experience at a newspaper. These days employers do not want to spend time to train up employees (not necessarily something I agree with but that’s a different story) so by gaining experience in a variety of different areas will make you more desirable.

Admittedly I did go on a  ‘placement’ module which was helping one of the university academic’s with research. I was interviewed which meant being up against my course mates so was thrilled when I got the placement. However this wasn’t enough. All my research could be done from home so I wasn’t in a physical work area where I could interact with people, the consequence of this was no networking. Nonetheless juggling two research projects in my final year (the other being the dissertation) showed potential employers that I could deal with pressure and I think was one of the reasons why I was employed in my first role after university.

il trading di opzioni binarie Gain lots of work experience in a variety of different areas.
In three years the only job I held down was a full time cleaning role in the summer holiday and about four weeks work experience in a school because at the time I thought I wanted to be a teacher. Therefore I had tonnes of spare time in term time and just wasted it. I should have written down two or three career paths I was interested in, got on the phone and asked places if they would take someone on for a few weeks. A student on my course at one point held down five different paid and unpaid jobs in her degree so gained many transferable skills that made her stand out. She deservedly was the first student on my course who landed herself a graduate role.

24 year old guy dating 12 year old Research the jobs market
Studying Geography I was focused on the environment and humanitarian work. However I didn’t research if there were many long term roles in that area and what skills are required. If I had researched this I would have been able to tailor my experiences to fulfill the skills requirements or broaden my horizons a lot more.